Charlie Hunter Trio Featuring Lucy Woodward (at Union Stage) – Tickets – Jammin Java – Vienna, VA – February 3rd, 2018

Charlie Hunter Trio Featuring Lucy Woodward (at Union Stage)

Charlie Hunter Trio Featuring Lucy Woodward (at Union Stage)

Saturday February 03, 2018

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Premier $22

This event is all ages

• Concert is at Union Stage 740 Water Street SW, D.C.!

Charlie Hunter
Charlie Hunter
As a young guitarist growing up in the San Francisco Bay Area, Charlie Hunter was looking for a way to stand out in the '80s. His primary influences were jazz great Joe Pass and the fluid Tuck Andress (of the guitar/vocal duo Tuck & Patti), both six-string guitarists who were adept at blending bass notes into their standard guitar melodies to make themselves sound like two musicians at once. But Hunter wanted to take it one step further and set out to find an instrument on which he could simultaneously function as both a guitarist and a bassist. For his self-titled 1993 debut CD, Hunter played a seven-string guitar for the duality effect, locking down the bottom with drummer Jay Lane and mixing melodically with saxophonist David Ellis. But on his trio's 1995 sophomore release, Bing, Bing, Bing!, Hunter unveiled his custom-made Novax eight-string, the guitar that finally allowed him to realize his capacity. Designed by Ralph Novak, the instrument featured special frets and separate signals for its guitar and bass portions. Picking bass notes with his right thumb while fretting them with his left index finger (while at the same time fingerpicking guitar chords and single notes with his right hand's remaining four digits as he frets with his left hand's other three fingers), Hunter achieves the real sound of two-for-one.

Hunter played with the side group T.J. Kirk in the mid-'90s, a band that derived their name from the cover material they exclusively played: Thelonious Monk, James Brown, and Rahsaan Roland Kirk. Initially wanting to call themselves James T. Kirk before being threatened by the Star Trek TV and film series, T.J. Kirk released a self-titled 1995 debut and the 1996 follow-up, If Four Was One, before disbanding.Hunter took drummer Scott Amendola with him for his next project, an ambitious instrumental remake of Bob Marley’s Natty Dread album in its entirety. Also featuring saxophonists Kenny Brooks and Calder Spanier, the 1997 release beat the odds by becoming what is arguably Hunter's best album. After Spanier died from injuries sustained from being hit by a car, Hunter moved east to New York, taking Amendola with him. Teaming with vibraphonist Stefon Harris and percussionist John Santos, Charlie Hunter & Pound for Pound's 1998 CD Return of the Candyman is dedicated to Spanier. A departure from Natty Dread, mainly due to the work of Harris, the disc featured a vibes-heavy cover of Steve Miller's "Fly Like an Eagle."
Lucy Woodward
Lucy Woodward
"So, about that album title….”

“It’s the ‘neighbors telling you to turn down the music’ moment. It’s the magical hour,” explains Lucy Woodward. “It’s that moment when anything can go right or wrong,”

A perfect summation for Til They Bang on the Door, a slinky, brassy and decidedly sexy record that marks a bold, new direction for the singer.

Bang is the culmination of a long and decidedly varied musical journey for Woodward. The daughter of two classical musicians, the singer spent her childhood, as she puts it, “music-making and creating.” Fresh out of school, she was singing jazz on Bleecker St. for tips, singing in cover bands and writing songs before signing with Atlantic Records—a time period that saw her score a Top 40 hit with “Dumb Girls” and another Top 5 hit she wrote for Stacie Orrico called “(There's Gotta Be) More to Life.”

But Woodward had no desire to be a pop starlet: her follow-up, the jazzier Lucy Woodward is...Hot and Bothered, produced by Itaal Shur (Santana, Maxwell) and Tim K (Tiny Hearts) was released in a unique indie arrangement with Barnes and Noble. This, in turn, was followed by Hooked!, an album of Brill Building meets swing-styled songs, released on Verve and produced by Tony Visconti (David Bowie, T-Rex).

Along the way, Woodward toured as a band member filling in for the lead singer of Pink Martini. She has also recorded with Rod Stewart, Celine Dion, Carole King, and Joe Cocker. Her songs and vocals have been heard in movies including What a Girl Wants, The Blind Side, Music and Lyrics, First Daughter and Ice Princess, featuring the Betty Hutton/Bjork classic “It’s Oh So Quiet."

Bang marks Woodward’s long-awaited solo return, her first album in six years. “It took a while, but I knew where I wanted to go with this record,” she says. “And I knew who I wanted to work with.”

Looking for “crazy low brass instrumentation with feminine vocals,” she paired up with an all-star recording cast, featuring co-producer Michael League (Snarky Puppy), co-producer/ keyboardist extraordinaire Henry Hey (David Bowie, George Michael), engineer/mixer Nic Hard, organist Cory Henry and core musicians from Snarky Puppy. “I loved collaborating with some of the best musicians in New York who also happen to be dear friends. I’ve worked with them all over the years,” she says. “I had been touring with Snarky Puppy which is what sparked the whole concept. In pretty much one Skype conversation with Henry, Mike and I, we knew where this was going to go. I wanted to surf on a wave of horns.”

Lyrically, the record is Woodward’s most dramatic, offering moments of both melancholia and wild abandon. “Much of Bang is me coming out of a breakup and not having the money for therapy,” she says, laughing. “It’s being not quite ready for another relationship and seeing the beauty within that stage, too. But hey, I’ve always written sad love songs, even when I was 12, before I even knew what love songs really were.”

The unfolding romantic twists and turns Woodward embraces on Bang is matched by the dramatic fits in her music: opening with the Shirley Bassey-style “Ladykiller,” the album segues into upbeat pop (first single “Kiss Me Mister Histrionics”) and one guaranteed live singalong “Be My Husband” (recorded with the ever-soulful Everett Bradley) before ending—like the moment after a big storm settles—with the beautiful piano ballad “Free Spirit.”

You may recognize a few tracks: Ruth Brown’s “I Don’t Know” has been part of Woodward’s live arsenal for years, as well as a new take on “Too Hot to Last,” featuring a trombone choir as a backdrop for the piece. Originally the song was performed by Woodward with Snarky Puppy on their 2013 Grammy-winning Family Dinner (Volume 1) album.

Bang is Woodward’s first release for GroundUP, the breakthrough indie label started by Michael League (a co-producer on Bang). Being on GroundUP is no comparison to anything else I’ve ever done,” she says. “There’s no A&R person saying “Do this or do that.” We all just want each other to be happy. We all have this idea that as long as the vibe is great, and with the right dynamic, anything is possible.”

Woodward plans to hit the road soon, performing for one of the most diverse fan bases in modern music. “I can see an audience growing with me,” she says. “When I play live, there are fans from 10 or 15 years ago bringing their kids. But now, I’ve been exposed a bit more to the jazz world and from working with Rod Stewart and they are all incredibly supportive.”

“I’ve never worked so hard in my life!” she admits, after juggling tours with Rod Stewart and running home to finish recording the album the past couple of years. “Four records in, and I can tell you, it’s been a rollercoaster. But what other choice do I have? You have to love, love, love what you do so much. And I do. It’s kinda cool that I still surprise myself.”

Not leaving her with time for a lot of those, well, “magical hours.”
Venue Information:
Jammin Java
227 Maple Ave E
Vienna, VA, 22180