Rock This Holiday w/ Simplified + Honor By August + The Roosevelts + Sam Grow + Michael Tolcher + Andy Suzuki & The Method + Luke Brindley – TWO NIGHT PASS! – Tickets – Jammin Java – Vienna, VA – January 1st, 2016

Rock This Holiday w/ Simplified + Honor By August + The Roosevelts + Sam Grow + Michael Tolcher + Andy Suzuki & The Method + Luke Brindley - TWO NIGHT PASS!

Rock This Holiday w/ Simplified + Honor By August + The Roosevelts + Sam Grow + Michael Tolcher + Andy Suzuki & The Method + Luke Brindley - TWO NIGHT PASS!

Friday January 01, 2016 - Saturday January 02, 2016

Doors: 6:30 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

This event is all ages

• Full dinner and drink menu available

• The Premier Plus section is a raised area with great views and reserved seats and tables. There is a dedicated server for faster service

Simplified
Simplified
When the laid back vibe of Myrtle Beach, SC meets acoustic rock of Lake Michigan, Simplified, the island rock band arrives with a loud and welcoming splash. In 2002, Clee Laster of SC and Chris Sheridan a MI native, started out as an acoustic duo. Early on, both musicians displayed innate musical capabilities, which were passed down from family members, and inspired by a diverse collection of original influences. They both grew up on the water, in different parts of the country, but the beach life-blood continues to surge within their suntanned souls, flowing forth in passionate, fun, and energetic jams.

They began playing acoustic shows, revving up and charming the Charlotte, NC crowds, while writing original songs. In 2003, the full band took shape as Simplified. Acclaimed as a dedicated touring machine, they gained new fans, one by one. Simplified's sound caught on, with a devoted fan base in the Southeastern US. With their incessant touring, an enthusiastic buzz was growing, and in turn they began booking shows nationwide, playing for increasingly larger audiences.

With a never-ending tour schedule, including over 3,000 powerhouse, popular performances, Simplified members, with both electric and acoustic acts, are enthusiastic as ever. From Key West, FL to New York City and throughout the Midwest, their hard work, perseverance and commitment have always been key to their hard earned success. Sequentially, in 2011, their song "Shall We Begin" was featured on ESPN's 'Kick off to College GameDay.' Currently their hit "Gettin Home," is featured in the video game, NASCAR The Game 2013 and they have been praised as one of Pandora Radio's top played indie rock bands.

Still writing and riding the sometimes choppy, always exciting musical shores, Clee and Sheridan reinvented the band in 2013 with their newest material, while getting back to their island rock roots. This year, they are releasing tracks from their crowd-pleasing, May 10th, 2013 show at Hideaway Cafe in St. Petersburg, FL. Sheridan states, "Our fans have been requesting a live album so we are focusing on getting as much live content out as possible."
Sheridan and Clee have effectively reformulated the band by adding key ingredients: new players with positive energy, multi-instrumentalists, and a camaraderie that stimulates their passion for writing new material. Now abandoning what others suggested, returning to their roots of a feel good vibe, Clee explains, "We are writing new songs for ourselves and our fans, not for a producer or critic. We are getting right back to where we started, with what we know and love…music that makes you smile."

Their signature sound is a contagious fusion of rock and reggae, attracting a diverse audience and embracing every kind of fan. Sheridan emphasizes, "We're a rock band with elements of reggae, funk, and acoustic roots. We don't limit ourselves musically and it shows in the songs we write." Conjuring up the island rock roots, Clee expresses, "Our live shows are all about having fun. Each performance will bring you to the beach and right back home."
A decade later, Simplified continues to evolve and attract new audiences through their crowd-pleasing, relatable songs and ongoing support from their loyal fans. Starting out as two musicians with a dream, to one of the industry's top emerging rock bands, makes Simplified a true tour de force. There's nothing simple about that.
Honor By August
Honor By August
For acclaimed modern rock quartet Honor By August there is a lot in a name. The "August" in the Washington, D.C.-based band's name refers to another interpretation of the word: to inspire awe or admiration. Taken as a whole, "Honor By August" means gaining honor by doing something admirable or awe-inspiring. "The name informs our music in several ways. We all believe in doing things the right way, with integrity, and making music that comes from a place of true inspiration," says lead vocalist/guitarist Michael Pearsall. On their latest release, the stunning Monuments To Progress, out April 23, 2013, the band does just that. Honor By August delves soulfully deep and delivers its finest collection of emotionally charged contemporary rock.

Honor By August's poetic sincerity and infectious blend of mesmerizing atmospherics with anthemic choruses have drawn favorable comparisons to U2, Kings of Leon, Snow Patrol and Bruce Springsteen. The Washington Post has called the quartet "one of the most promising new talents on the East Coast." Recently, the band won Billboard's "World Song Contest." The group has shared stages with such diverse artists as Bon Jovi, Imagine Dragons, Third Eye Blind, Switchfoot, Hanson and Parachute. As a main attraction, Honor By August has pulled over 900 into DC's esteemed 9:30 Club. The group's music has been broadcast to millions many times over on ESPN, E! and popular MTV shows, and Honor By August has worked with Grammy-winning producers, mixers and engineers including Jack Joseph Puig (U2, Snow Patrol, Rolling Stones), Paul David Hager (Goo Goo Dolls), Jeff Juliano (John Mayer, O.A.R, Lifehouse), Toby Wright (Third Eye Blind) and Jim Ebert (Butch Walker, Meredith Brooks).

Honor By August formed in 2005 and is Michael Pearsall, lead vocals/guitar; Evan Field, guitar/piano/backing vocals; Chris Rafetto bass/piano/backing vocals; and Brian Shanley drums/percussion. The brave emotionality in its music reflects the band's commitment to writing honestly about life. "We hope that our music finds a place in people's lives wherever they may be on the spectrum of life's highs and lows," Pearsall says. "If you're going through a tough time, hopefully one of our songs will help you through it. If you're having a great time, hopefully one of our songs can enhance that experience. Life is what we make of it so why not try to make the most of it?"

Monuments To Progress benefits from a period of fluid creativity within the band. "The writing process was much more collaborative in nature this time around. Everybody contributed songs and/or lyrical ideas so there's a real sense of collective ownership," Pearsall reveals. Letting the songwriting process flow organically has enabled the band to write its strongest material. The upliftingly introspective "Last Chance" is the album's lead single. It's a gorgeously cathartic track with a nuanced and shimmering verse exploding into a soaring chorus hook. The song's immediacy and messaging is refreshingly empowering. "It's about that moment where you feel like things are falling apart around you but you're not quite ready to throw in the towel," Pearsall says. "The song is about recognizing that you have a chance to turn it around."

Other standouts are "Believe" and the hypnotic "Already Yours." "Believe," the track that gave the album its title, builds from stately acoustics to a walk-on-the-clouds climax, its sweeping dynamics perfectly tailored to suit powerfully introspective lyrics like "working so hard to build these monuments to progress, though we may never see tomorrow." "That lyric represents a theme threaded throughout the record," Pearsall says. "Whether it's something as serious as faith in yourself and your ability to love and care for another person or something as simple as pursuing happiness in the moment...All we do in our lives makes us who we are. All these things are monuments to progress." "Already Yours" is boldly romantic. "It is a song about putting up a fight for love," Pearsall says. "It's also an invitation for someone to love you. It's saying, 'I'm here…All you have to do is step up and give me some sign that you're ready to take a chance on us.'"

Monuments To Progress was recorded at Cue Recording in Falls Church, VA, and produced by Jim Ebert (Butch Walker, Meredith Brooks). This time the band went for a richer sonic tapestry than their previous releases, opting for a fuller sound and a variety of elegantly subtle textures. The recording was fan-funded through a tremendously successful Kickstarter campaign. "It was encouraging and humbling to see how much people believed in us and wanted to hear more music from Honor By August," Pearsall says.

"We've met a lot of great bands and made a lot of great fans on the road. We've seen more of this beautiful country in a few years than most people see in a lifetime," Pearsall says, reflecting on the band's 8-year history. "Up until recently we've done it all without much help from anyone in the industry. Thanks to our fans, families and friends, as well as our continued belief in ourselves, we've been able to share what we love to do with a small part of the world. We hope this record allows us to continue that journey and share our music with even more people all over the world."
The Roosevelts
The Roosevelts
“It’s rock – with a mandolin.”

Though it’s virtually impossible to classify the thoroughly unique entity that is The Roosevelts, this statement by guitarist Jason Kloess certainly tells part of the story. As one half of the electric duo along with singer James Mason, the two brothers in song – not blood, though maybe beards – have been playing together for years and cultivating a sound that’s a little bluesy, a little bit country, a little bit rock ‘n’ roll. Sure, there’s some mandolin in there. But most importantly, there’s no bells, no whistles, no sparkly wallet chains: just heartfelt, genuine music that belongs to them alone, not any genre.

“We hope our music will break your heart and make you shout for joy, all at the same time,” says Kloess. And it certainly will. Formed in 2012 when Mason and Kloess were introduced through a mutual friend in their current hometown of Austin, Texas, they’ve followed their natural inclination to write songs that tap into pure emotion shaped with jubilant musicianship and introspective lyrics, building a devoted fan base along the way – a fan base that Mason and Kloess often make sure to chat with on a first-name basis out in the crowd as much as from the stage. Because this is a band about breaking down walls, not building them up.

But The Roosevelts actually almost never came to be. Mason was ready to purse a career in medicine, pondering graduate school after working as a medic on ambulances and as a lobbyist in healthcare policy. While both he and Kloess had played music since their youth, it had always just been for the joy of it – it was upon a roommate’s urging that he decided to take the plunge and give Austin a trial shot before committing to a future in the medical field. It was a gamble, but a good one.

“Even for my first two years in Austin, I wasn’t sure if I wanted a career in music,” says Mason, “but from the moment we became and recorded as The Roosevelts, I knew it would become my career.” The past year has seen the band debut their song “Cold Sheets” on CMT and tour extensively as they prepare for the release of their debut full-length album.

Kloess, who had begun his musical journey on piano, and Mason, who “caught the bug” in high school, bonded in Austin over a mutual love of the same influences: the song writing of James Taylor, the keen lyricism of Ryan Adams, the heartfelt soul of Matt Nathanson. And, of course, their southern roots – Mason hails from Houston, Texas and Kloess from Birmingham, Alabama – which brings a country flair to their work that’s more about time-honored harmonies and illuminating lyrics than anything particularly twangy. Though they aren’t brothers, there’s a clear brotherhood that emanates from the music – one listen to the way their voices ring together, and it seems they were destined to be a band.

Or maybe it’s a little more simple. “It really was just his beautiful beard that attracted me to him,” says Kloess, laughing. Certainly, their sense of humor and lighthearted approach to life is a pillar of their identity. After joining forces, they wrote over fifty songs together, narrowing the work down to a succinct, acclaimed EP, Cold Sheets, for which they partnered with producer Dwight Baker. The collection of tracks showcases their strengths as a unit: smart, soulful grooves with crisp harmonies and sweetly infectious refrains that could fill living rooms just as easily as stadiums.

“I think James is really good at writing lyrics, and I’m better at doing more composition and arrangement, and those two together ware a nice harmony for us,” says Kloess. Adds Mason, ” We kind of complete the package together. Jason is a more technical player. I never took any lessons, it was always just learning what chords look like and putting my fingers in the right places and singing songs. And for Jason, there was more technical skill involved with playing lead guitar, he knew the theory, and I didn’t have that.”

The place where their individual talents meet is one full of heartfelt, southern charm that artfully tackles a common theme: relationships. Whether it’s love or something else, their music often taps into this relatable human experience. “A lot of our songs are kind of geared around love or heartbreak or um…pretty much love or heartbreak,” Kloess laughs. Adds Mason, “I think certainly when one listens on the surface, the word “love” is mentioned a lot, but I think the word ‘love’ is not always completely related to traditional love. I think it’s about relationships. Relationships really inspire our songs, and of course, some of the easiest relationships to write about, if you’re digging in, are romantic ones. But the inspiration is not always romantic. It’s about connecting with people.”

Relating and interacting with others is a huge part of The Roosevelts. Mason and Kloess love to meet and get to know their fans, and even have found that to be one of the most crucial, rewarding parts of the process. For Mason, these interpersonal relationships have been an element of the music that provide a similar reward that he longed for in a medical career.
“The hardest part of consciously allowing myself to let go of medicine was the loss of the sensation that I was actually helping people,” Mason says. “Although I’m not saving lives with music, I have found that this platform allows me to connect with people on a deeper level than most other professions. There’s something powerful, and at times healing, in these relationships.”

For their fans, the healing comes in the music – cathartic, joyful, full of life and light. It’s unique, it’s the Roosevelts, it’s rock – with a mandolin.
Sam Grow
Sam Grow
Born and raised in Southern Maryland, Sam's love of performing and connection with his fans continue to fill various venues. His powerful vocals and highly personal lyrics draw you into his songs as he tells stories of love, heartbreak, and life.
Michael Tolcher
Michael Tolcher
I was born in Front Royal, Virginia and raised just south of Atlanta, Georgia. Music moved me to dance and sing at a very young age--I am indeed the family ham!

I wrote and recorded my first official album in 2004 called "I Am", which enabled me to tour the country opening for bands such as: Maroon5, Dave Mathews Band, Hanson, Blues Traveler, OAR, Gavin Degraw and many others. My music has been featured in several TV shows and movies --> "Scrubs", "One Tree Hill", "Sopranos", "Life As We Know It" among others. I had the privilege of writing music for HBO and several Hilton commercial campaigns including the 2008 Olympics, where they used my song "Speed Feels Better".

I learned piano around age 10 and guitar around 18 --- I wrote songs every several years when falling for a girl prevented me from sleeping. My favorite form of writing is in the moment... many call freestyling-- it's a mind bending rollercoaster that ignites my mind, body, and spirit....and seems to do the same for the audience 🙂

I released my new album, "Eleven" May 4th 2015 --> eleven years to the day since "I Am". I wrote and produced this one ... quite an epic undertaking and learning experience. I'm excited to be touring again and continuing my journey with one mission- to ignite the human spirit in myself and others thru music.
Andy Suzuki
Andy Suzuki
Brooklyn's Andy Suzuki and Kozza Olatunji-Babumba (of Andy Suzuki & The Method)
 have been making music together for nearly a decade, but now with their third full-length album, The Glass Hour, a creative friendship has flowered into a formidable musical force. The half-Japanese, half-Jewish Suzuki and hand-percussionist Kozza (grandson of percussion legend Babtunde Olatunji) first garnered wider attention with their buoyant, organic folk-pop album, Born out of Mischief, and soon found themselves opening for names as large as Ringo Starr, Eric Hutchinson, Joshua Radin, Marc Broussard, Delta Rae, and Tyrone Wells. Fans fell hard for their combination of a "velvet voice" (NPR) and their “deadly way with melody" (TimeOut New York). Their sinuous songwriting, which curves into eddies and unexpected shapes at every measure, is steadied by Andy's impossibly dulcet vocals, that carry us gently through as the songs toss and heave. The Glass Hour keeps all these curves and fleecy vocals, but no longer wants the limits of the folk-pop label. Instead, Andy and Kozza are aiming for nearly every place on your radio dial. There's tinseled RnB ballades like Shelter and Overtime, burning-rubber country rock like Digging My Way Out, adamant life-anthems like Fight and Fire, and the verifiably ready-to-drop pop of I Need You More. To pull off this kind of range, Andy and Kozza enlisted the production talents of LA-based Juny Mag, and also brought in big guns Dominic Fallacaro, Will Hensley, Chris Gehringer— all Grammy winners— for recording, mixing and mastering a project of its stylistic breadth.

The Glass Hour begins reminiscent of their previous styles, but soon shifts to stranger things, to a near future pop that sounds like it’s beaming in from the year 2019. Its rhythmic intricacies still reflect the hand-percussionist half of their writing team, only with Juny Mag scaling everything up to stadium-sized dimensions. Its sensibilities hover somewhere between Jack Garratt and Michael Jackson, and nowhere is this clearer than on I Can't Live, Overtime, and— unmistakably— on I Need You More, which could easily double as a movie soundtrack to an impromptu streetdancing scene. Then, with another flick of the radio dial, we coast through stretches of soul and blues that would be the envy of Amos Lee, and hear great cloudbursts of gospel choir breaking through on Shelter and Fire. With another flick, we run from unapologetically earnest love songs like Searching and Mama Told Me to power-numbers like Fight, Digging My Way Out and Come Forward, then back again to the stripped-down, unplugged rawness of Hold You and the soul-searching bittersweetness of Forgiven. Andy and Kozza like to continually surprise their listeners— and themselves. They are happiest when they're unsure what's coming next. The only certainty is that they've only begun, with 2017 already booked full with a headlining tour, a prominent spot on the Rockboat line-up, and a new album proudly in hand.
Luke Brindley
Luke Brindley
Check out Luke's new fingerstyle guitar record on iTunes here or direct here!

“The rambling acoustic environment of New Morning—era Dylan and the smokiness of early Townes Van Zandt…his own compelling musical voice.” – Acoustic Guitar

“Digging deep and mining for the soul…One Of The Top 12 Albums of the Year” – Paste Magazine

“Magical…an early contender for one the best albums of the year.” – The Washington Post

I’ve been obsessed with writing songs and the guitar for as long as I can remember. I married young, am an adoptive parent, and the son of a preacher man. I toured a lot for a few years and put out a few records as Luke Brindley, Brindley Brothers, and Native Run. I never quite fit into (or cared about) “the business”. I grew up in New Jersey but live outside of Washington, DC. Along with my brothers, I run Jammin Java in Vienna,VA – one of the Top 100 Clubs In The World.

The songs have a definite focus on the lyrics and hopefully offer a kind of deeper perspective. I tend to gravitate toward the larger worldview questions such as, Why are we here? What are we supposed to be doing? What does it mean to know another person? To love someone?

In 2010 I released A Hidden Wholeness.

In 2011 and 2012, I released two records with my old band, Native Run.

In 2013, I released a song every week (52 songs) with producer Chip Johnson and some talented special guests. You can download them here: http://bit.ly/1dVeQPL

In 2014 I released The Whiskey Switch, a stripped-down folk/americana record with Taylor Swift sideman, Mike Meadows, on mandolin and banjo and DC’s Laura Tsaggaris on harmonies.

In 2015 I released Crack of Light - a fan-funded, full-band record featuring Stephen Kellogg, The Alternate Routes, Emily Hearn, Molly Parden, and more. It received airplay on SiriusXM and was featured in The Washington Post, American Songwriter, and more.

In 2016 I am releasing Invitation To Joy, an 12-song album of fingerstyle guitar instrumentals featuring special guests David Mansfield (Bob Dylan, T-Bone Burnett, Bobby McFerrin) on mandolin and fiddle, Todd Isler (Sting, Mike Gordon) on percussion, and Joe Fitzgerald (Pat Metheny, Dave Liebman) on bass.

I'm not touring at the moment so I write and record a lot. Currently, I'm recording a fingerstyle guitar record and am writing a lot with other people, raising a family, and running one of the best clubs in the country.
Venue Information:
Jammin Java
227 Maple Ave E
Vienna, VA, 22180
https://jamminjava.com/